Insecure Android apps put connected cars at risk

20160224 stock mwc freeway cars traffic barcelona

Android applications that allow millions of car owners to remotely locate and unlock their vehicles are missing security features that could prevent tampering by hackers.

Researchers from antivirus vendor Kaspersky Lab took seven of the most popular Android apps that accompany connected cars from various manufacturers and analyzed them from the perspective of a compromised Android device. The apps and manufacturers have not been named.

The researchers looked at whether such apps use any of the available countermeasures that would make it hard for attackers to hijack them when the devices they’re installed on are infected with malware. Other types of applications, such as banking apps, have such protections.

The analysis revealed that none of the tested applications used code obfuscation to make it harder for attackers to reverse engineer them and none of them used code integrity checks to prevent malicious manipulation.

Two applications didn’t encrypt the login credentials stored locally and four encrypted only the password. None of the apps checked if the devices they’re running on are rooted, which could indicate that they’re insecure and possibly compromised.

Finally, none of the tested applications used overlay protections to prevent other apps from drawing over their screens. There are malware apps that display fake log-in screens on top of other apps in order to trick users to expose their log-in credentials.

While compromising connected car apps might not directly enable theft, it could make it easier for would-be thieves. Most such apps, or the credentials they store, can be used to remotely unlock the vehicle and disable its alarm system.

“Also, the risks should not be limited to mere car theft,” the Kaspersky researchers said in a blog post. “Accessing the car and deliberate tampering with its elements may lead to road accidents, injuries, or death.”

While manufacturers are rushing to add smart features to cars that are meant to improve the experience for car owners, they tend to focus more on securing the back-end infrastructure and the communications channels. However, the Kaspersky researchers warn that client-side code, such as the accompanying mobile apps, should not be ignored as it’s the easiest target for attackers and most likely the most vulnerable spot.

“Being an expensive thing, a car requires an approach to security that is no less meticulous than that of a bank account,” the researchers said.

 source”cnbc”

Microsoft’s decision to scrap February security updates unnerves patch experts

windows 10 wallpaper logo

Microsoft this week canceled February’s slate of security updates for Windows and its other products, including Office, just a day after saying that the fixes would only be delayed.

Patch experts struggled with the decision, pointing out that known vulnerabilities will go unpatched and that IT planning had been disrupted.

“I was shocked,” said Chris Goettl, product manager at patch management vendor Ivanti, formerly Shavlik. “I was really expecting [the patches to release] next week.”

On Tuesday, just hours before the month’s Patch Tuesday updates were to appear, Microsoft announced a delay. “We discovered a last-minute issue that could impact some customers and was not resolved in time for our planned updates today,” the company said at the time. The implication was that February’s security fixes would ship as soon as that “last-minute issue” was resolved.

But in a Wednesday revision to the original announcement, Microsoft said, “We will deliver updates as part of the planned March Update Tuesday, March 14, 2017.” (Microsoft prefers the label “Update Tuesday” to the more universal “Patch Tuesday.”)

Skipping a month’s update slate was unprecedented. Although Microsoft has not issued updates on four Patch Tuesdays since the 2003 debut of regularly-scheduled updates—most recently in March 2007—those were instances when no patches had been prepared. It has never missed a month when there were clearly fixes prepped and ready to go.

“This isn’t like before when no updates meant nothing was ready,” said Susan Bradley, the moderator of the PatchMangement.org mailing list, where business IT administrators discuss update tradecraft. “Patches were ready. They just—for whatever unknown reason—couldn’t be delivered.” Bradley also writes about Microsoft’s patching processes for the Windows Secrets newsletter.

Microsoft has not said what prompted the delay, or what triggered the expansion of that into the month’s cancelation.

Without a declaration from the Redmond, Wash. company, speculation about the cause has been rife. Some believed that a single faulty patch had shelved them all, but that made little sense, Goettl said Wednesday when he pointed out that Office patches are delivered separately from those addressing vulnerabilities in Windows. If a single patch for Windows held back the Windows cumulative update, the Office update should have remained viable.

Two days ago, Goettl argued that the extent of the cancelation—all updates—hinted at problems with the company’s update service infrastructure. In an interview today, he stuck by his guns. “This is something bigger than a single patch,” Goettl said, “something with Windows Update or the update replication process.”

Bradley decried the lack of information from Microsoft, which, she said, only fueled conjecture, including her own. “My gut tells me something was up with the [update] publishing engine, [but] again merely speculation,” she said.

The experts agreed that the cancelation of February’s updates will affect Windows customers, but not on the extent of the disruption. “I think there will be minor disruptions, along the lines of needing to re-plan [for deploying the updates] for next month,” said Goettl when asked how the missing month would affect IT administrators.

“Is it [having an impact?] I’d say yes, it is, given the vibe I’m getting from my peers,” Bradley said.

Without February’s patches, security researchers have said, some unprotected systems may be compromised by exploits of now-known vulnerabilities.

Agreeing, Bradley ticked off several obvious ones. “We now have a potentially ticking time bomb on our hands as we’re not expected to get [this month’s Adobe] Flash update on our Windows 8 and Windows 10 [PCs] until March,” she said. “We have a SMB zero-day denial of service [vulnerability] we now need to investigate mediations for.”

The latter Windows vulnerability went public Feb. 2; a patch was anticipated in the now-canceled batch that was to ship Tuesday.

And come March, there’s a chance that the increased size and complexity—two months’ worth of fixes rather than one—could toss a wrench into the works. “The [update], when it arrives, at least for the pre-Windows 10 versions, may have twice as much change in it, and most likely, twice as much a chance of breaking something,” contended Goettl.

For all the complaints from patch professionals like Goettl and Bradley, as well as IT administrators and Windows users in general, the snafu—whatever its cause—will not change Microsoft’s fortunes or in a material way, even its reputation.

“We have no choice to accept [how things are] if we are running Windows,” said Bradley, voicing the reality in business. But that doesn’t mean customers have to like it.

“If they don’t have a Plan B, we don’t have one either,” Bradley said.

This story, “Microsoft’s decision to scrap February security updates unnerves patch experts” was originally published by Computerworld.

source”cnbc”

Radeon Vega vs. GeForce GTX 1080 Ti? AMD, Nvidia announce dueling events at GDC 2017

radeon nano and gtx 980 ti

The annual Game Developers Conference usually maintains an intense software focus, but GDC 2017 seems to be shaping up as a hit for PC hardware enthusiasts, too. Both AMD and Nvidia have announced events taking place alongside GDC, and in fact, both are being held on the very same day—February 28.

First up: AMD, which is reviving the “Capsaicin” event that debuted at GDC 2016. Here’s what’s on tap, according to the event registration:

“The Capsaicin livestream kicks off at 10:30 a.m. from Ruby Skye, a feature-packed show highlighting the hottest new graphics and VR technologies propelling the games industry forward.”

That sure makes it sound like more Radeon Vega graphics card details are on the way, doesn’t it? And that’s bolstered by the Capsaicin page on the Radeon website calling the event “and exclusive glimpse into the Summer of Radeon and beyond!” But don’t be surprised if AMD’s hotly anticipated Ryzen processors steal some of the spotlight, too.

A March 2 GDC session dedicated to the chips enticed developers with “Join AMD Game Engineering team members for an introduction to the recently-launched AMD Ryzen CPU followed by advanced optimization topics.” Recently launched, huh? That verbiage has since been scrubbed from the listing, but during a recent financial call, AMD CEO Lisa Su said that Ryzen will launch in early March. Considering all that, a Ryzen appearance at Capsaicin 2017 seems very possible indeed.

source”cnbc”

The best cybersecurity advice from experts at RSA

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Come to the RSA show, and you’ll find plenty of cybersecurity technology. The top vendors from across the industry are here, showing products for fighting ransomware, preventing data breaches and more.

But even the best security software is useless if users and businesses aren’t taking the right steps to protect themselves. So we asked experts at the show for their best cybersecurity tips.

Joe Stewart, director of malware research at Dell SecureWorks 

He advises everyone to set up two-factor authentication to protect their internet accounts, especially email. It can be particularly useful when stopping hackers who are trying to steal login passwords from users, whether through malware or email phishing schemes.

Even if the hacker manages to loot your passwords, two-factor authentication ensures you’re still protected from all but the most sophisticated attacks. Access to your account will require another form of authentication, such as your fingerprint or a text message from your mobile phone.

“This would stop most of these fraudsters cold,” Stewart said. “Because they are not operating on that level, with things like banking malware that can manage to bypass two-factor authentication.”

“This would cut out most of the business email compromise right there,” he said.

Mike Sentonas, vice president of technology strategy at CrowdStrike

Businesses need to first think about what assets they’re trying to protect from cyber threats, as opposed to blindly buying the latest security products, Sentonas said.

Those assets might be your staff, your intellectual property, your customer database, or something else. “Everybody has something of value,” he said. “Understand what you have that’s valuable. And then understand where it is, and who has access to it.”

“That’s going to generate conversations around: ‘Do we need education? Do we need people to come in to help us build a stronger architecture?” Sentonas said. “It’s not always about buying the latest and greatest widget. Sometimes, it ends up there. But it shouldn’t be the starting point.”

Mike Buratowski, vice president of cybersecurity services at Fidelis Cybersecurity

Many people still think hackers will never target them. But that assumption is wrong, Buratowski said. “Everybody’s information is valuable,” he said.

Although people don’t need to be paranoid, they do need a healthy sense of awareness that cyberattacks are real and often involve hackers trying to exploit gullible victims, he said. For example, employees are often quick to respond to email phishing schemes, thinking the message came from a legitimate source.

“The person on the other end may not be who they say they are,” he said.

Chris Wysopal, chief technology officer at Veracode

Don’t completely trust the technology. That includes the software and internet services you use or buy. For all you know, none of it is secure, and it may be easy to breach, Wysopal said.

source”cnbc”

Three ways to restrict OneDrive uploads in Windows 10

onedrivelogo

Sometimes you just don’t want OneDrive to do its job and start uploading and syncing files at will. This can be for any number of reasons, but the top two are usually because you’re doing a resource-intensive operation like gaming or your internet connection isn’t the fastest.

During those moments you have three relatively easy options for dealing with OneDrive in Windows 10: Shut it down until later, pause file syncing for a preset period, or slow down the sync speed to free up bandwidth resources.

For all of these tips we’re going to access the OneDrive app for Windows 10 from the notifications area. Click the upward-facing arrow on the far right of the taskbar and look for the OneDrive icon (a pair of white clouds).

Pause syncing

onedrivepausesyncingIan Paul/PCWorld

Pressing pause on OneDrive is probably the easiest thing to do. Get to the OneDrive icon as described above, right-click it, and select Pause syncing. You’ll then see options to pause OneDrive for 2, 8, or 24 hours.

Choose you’re desired pause time, and you’re done.

Shutdown OneDrive

Option number two is also pretty easy. Right-click the OneDrive icon again and select Exit. A small pop-up window will appear in the middle of your desktop asking if you’re sure you want to shut down OneDrive. Click Close OneDrive.

Just remember that OneDrive is now off and won’t turn on again until you either reboot your PC or manually activate it.

Throttle

microsoftonedrivesettings

Ian Paul/PCWorld

The last option is to limit the upload speed that OneDrive can hit. By default, OneDrive adjusts its upload rate automatically, but when you need bandwidth for other things, manually limiting the upload speed is a good option.

Access the OneDrive icon once again, right-click it, and then select Settings.

A settings window will open. Click on the Network tab. At the top of this tab is a section called Upload rate with three radio buttons: Adjust automatically, Don’t limit, Limit to.

Select Limit to and then decide on a rate, which is measured in kilobytes per second. The default limit is 125KBps, but if you’d like it to use even less bandwidth, go for 100KBps or even 20KBps. At the latter rate a 2MB file would take around 90 seconds to two minutes to upload.

You can also choose to throttle download speeds, which might be helpful if you have a lot of shared documents on your PC that could be updated at the worst possible moment.

source”cnbc”

AMD bundles Ashes of the Singularity with FX processors ahead of Ryzen’s launch

The hotly anticipated Ryzen processors are expected to start rolling out in early March, but AMD’s still pushing its older FX-series chips folks looking to build a budget gaming PC. Newegg and AMD just revealed a FX processor promotion that bundles a 6- or 8-core chip with the real-time strategy game Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, the poster child for cutting-edge DirectX 12 technology.

The Newegg deal includes six popular FX processors ranging in price from $110 to $185, including the FX-6300, FX-6350, FX-8300, FX-8320, FX-8350, and FX-8370. The FX-8350 comes in the standard model for $140, or there’s a $160 version that comes with AMD’s swanky Wraith cooler. The FX-6350 and FX-8370 are also available with Wraith.

ashesofthesingularity

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AMD/Newegg

This is the second major FX-series freebie revealed in recent months. In August, AMD bundled its processors with a copy of the then-newly released Deus Ex: Mankind Divided.

The Stardock expansion to the original Ashes of the Singularity debuted in November 2016. While the original game was pretty darn good, the single player campaign left a lot to be desired. Escalation fixed those concerns and added additional polish to technical and gameplay aspects alike, such as ginormous maps, a strategic zoom view, additional units, and more. If you’re an RTS fan, you’ll love the complete package.

The story behind the story: AMD no doubt has tons of FX processor stock it would like to get rid of with Ryzen right around the corner. However, this year’s lineup change isn’t your typical one for AMD. Despite the addition of Ryzen, AMD’s first Zen-based chips, A- and FX-series processors are sticking around. AMD hopes to broaden its lineup to better compete with Intel. As they are newer, Ryzen chips will be the premium CPUs, while A- and FX-series chips will be aimed at budget gamers and other computer buyers looking for a deal.

source”cnbc”

Halo Wars 2 PC impressions: This console-fied RTS has some PC-specific problems

Halo Wars 2

It’s the week of unfinished reviews, eh? After trialing For Honor earlier this week, I’m back with some impressions on Halo Wars 2. Again, initial impressions, not a full review. Given that the Windows 10 version only went live on Monday and that its multiplayer servers have been entirely dead, I just haven’t spent enough time with it to feel comfortable slapping on a score yet.

And I almost passed up writing about it today, but there don’t seem to be many PC-centric impressions published and there’s stuff worth talking about.

Halo Wars 2

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Halo Wars 2

Please keep in mind: This article is going to slant mostly negative because I’m specifically talking about the problems I’ve encountered. Despite those problems, I’m having a fairly decent time with the game’s campaign so far and looking forward to playing more of the fast-paced Blitz mode now that the multiplayer servers are populated. Those are aspects I plan to talk about more in my full review. But with the game officially released today (to “Ultimate Edition” purchasers) it’s worth a quick post on the game’s myriad issues. There’s plenty of time to focus on the positives later.

We can start with performance, which (with Nvidia’s latest driver update) is mostly good on my Core i7-5820K and GeForce GTX 980 Ti. I’m pretty shocked I need a “mostly” qualifier on there though, because it’s a damn real-time strategy game, and not even a particularly strenuous one like Ashes of the Singularity. There are never that many units on-screen, nor are the maps any larger than what you might expect from StarCraft or Grey Goo. And yet I’ve had numerous instances where performance stuttered mid-mission. It’s particularly noticeable when coming back from any in-engine cutscene, with hitching motions and weird visual glitches (partially-loaded geometry, vanishing units, et cetera) as the game relinquishes control back to the player.

It works most of the time though, and honestly isn’t the biggest concern I’ve had.

For that, we’ve got to delve into how Halo Wars 2 plays moment-to-moment. The most frustrating issue I’ve noticed concerns the AI of your own units. It’s just so, so stupid sometimes.

Halo Wars 2

Halo Wars 2

Here’s the most reproducible error I’ve seen: 1) Take a large and varied group of units—some infantry, a few Warthogs, and maybe a captured Wraith. 2) Order them to attack a structure. 3) Notice that your Wraith, despite being ordered to attack, gets stuck behind your other units, just barely out of range of the thing you’re attacking, and thus decides not to fire on the enemy whatsoever. 4) All your soldiers get shredded apart while your Wraith driver sits and watches.

Units also—not always, but just often enough to make you irate—have a tendency to ignore enemies who they should maybe be paying attention to. This is particularly painful when a rogue group of Banshees flies in to raid your HQ and the anti-air units ten feet away on the other side of the base just hang out and do nothing. Or when enemy snipers have a fog of war advantage, attack, and since your units “can’t see” the enemy they do nothing. I’ve lost entire squads to a single sniper when I thought a battle was in-hand and didn’t think to check back on them until too late.

And then there are the control issues. Despite having full mouse-and-keyboard controls, I have some real issues with a few commands. For instance, to zoom in and out you need to hold the Alt key first. Result: You’ll never remember this, and thus never zoom in and out.

Halo Wars 2

Halo Wars 2

Why not just the mouse wheel? Because that’s used to select units within a group, of course! I only found this out maybe seven or eight hours in, seeing as the game never explained it. It’s the only way to select a certain type of unit inside a control group, since clicking on the pictures of the units in the bottom-left corner does nothing—probably because there’s no way to replicate that behavior on consoles, so it just wasn’t included.

A few units have special abilities, but all the abilities are triggered with the same key (“R”) so if you have mixed unit types in a control group you can’t use any of their abilities unless you highlight one type in particular. It’ll also use the ability for all those units at once, if you have multiple of the same type selected. This is particularly infuriating in cases where three Warthogs ram a target that would’ve died with one hit.

Special abilities are also very temperamental, sometimes deciding not to work even if you only have one unit selected. And you don’t actually select which unit to use an ability on—it just fires at whatever unit you happen to be mousing over at the time.

These are my major complaints so far, but there are other smaller problems. None of my Logitech G502’s extra buttons are recognized as valid inputs, for instance—not even the two thumb buttons, which are fairly standard for mouse mapping. There’s also no quicksave or quickload, which is both bizarre and annoying.

Oh, and the menus. This is a weird one, but the settings menus are so slow, i.e. display/keybindings/audio/et cetera. Most of these are multi-page affairs, but each page takes a second or two to display, which makes (for instance) adjusting controls a frustrating affair of “Scroll down, wait for settings to load in, scan names, scroll down, wait, scan, and repeat ad nauseum across nine or ten pages.”

Halo Wars 2

Halo Wars 2

Again, these are the problems I’ve experienced after three days with the PC version. There’s still plenty to like about the game. The campaign’s structure is about as generic as I’d feared after our hands-on last month, but it’s carried by some decent voice acting and beautiful cutscenes. Blitz mode still seems great. And hey, the whole endeavor still scores novelty points because “It’s Halo, but from a different perspective.” Never underestimate the power of a brand.

We’ll have a full review focused on those aspects soon—hopefully by the “official” launch day next week, once I’ve had more time to test out its multiplayer and finish up the last few campaign missions. But with the game technically released today to a subset of the public, I just wanted to bring to light some PC-specific issues for anyone who’s thinking of buying that version. It could use some polish.

source”cnbc”

Google Assistant will soon be able to buy stuff for you on command

google assistant payments

Google Assistant already helps us organize our shopping lists and find out about things we’re interested in, but it stops short at actually letting us buy items. With a new feature rolling out to Pixel phones, it looks like that’s about to change.

A new option for setting up payment methods has appeared in the Assistant settings for Pixel users, bringing the anticipated feature one step closer to reality. First discovered deep in the beta version of the Google App back in January, it seems as though Google is ready to pull the trigger on voice-powered payments, a major step in Google Assistant’s fight against Alexa and Siri.

Head into the Settings menu of the Google Assistant screen on your Pixel phone and you’ll see the new option for Payments under the Google Account section. This feature is separate from Android Pay, so tapping it will guide you through a series of steps that lets you store credit or debit cards that can be accessed by Google Assistant. At the end of the process, you’ll see a Pay through your Assistant toggle that will need to be turned blue in order to activate the feature.

There isn’t much you can do with the feature after it’s set up, but presumably Google will announce support for third-party stores shortly. At the start of the set-up process, you’ll need to accept the terms and conditions for both Google Payments and Google Express, an online marketplace that links to a number of popular stores, such as Walgreens, Costco, and Toys R Us, so at the very least you’ll be able to buy things there. However, asking Google Assistant to shop for something on Google Express merely brings up a search results screen.

Since the feature is tied to your Google account and not the Pixel phone specifically, it’s likely it will work with all of the devices integrated with Assistant, including Google Home and Android Wear 2.0 watches.

Speak ‘n shop: Amazon Echo users have long been able to order things from Amazon without lifting a finger, and it appears as though Google is looking to do the same thing. Pigs will fly before it includes support for Amazon’s boundless marketplace, which will severely limit its usefulness, but building payments into Google Assistant is an important step in the virtual bot’s development. And while it’s surprising that the steps here don’t include a vocal passcode option to protect against unintended purchases by our chatty kids, it’s likely Google will implement some kind of safeguard for the Home speaker once the feature is officially announced.

source”cnbc”

Radeon,Vega,vs.,GeForce,GTX,1080,Ti?,AMD,,Nvidia,announce,dueling,events,at,GDC,2017

radeon nano and gtx 980 ti

The annual Game Developers Conference usually maintains an intense software focus, but GDC 2017 seems to be shaping up as a hit for PC hardware enthusiasts, too. Both AMD and Nvidia have announced events taking place alongside GDC, and in fact, both are being held on the very same day—February 28.

First up: AMD, which is reviving the “Capsaicin” event that debuted at GDC 2016. Here’s what’s on tap, according to the event registration:

“The Capsaicin livestream kicks off at 10:30 a.m. from Ruby Skye, a feature-packed show highlighting the hottest new graphics and VR technologies propelling the games industry forward.”

That sure makes it sound like more Radeon Vega graphics card details are on the way, doesn’t it? But don’t be surprised if AMD’s hotly anticipated Ryzen processors steal some of the spotlight, too.

A March 2 GDC session dedicated to the chips enticed developers with “Join AMD Game Engineering team members for an introduction to the recently-launched AMD Ryzen CPU followed by advanced optimization topics.” Recently launched, huh? That verbiage has since been scrubbed from the listing, but during a recent financial call, AMD CEO Lisa Su said that Ryzen will launch in early March. Considering all that, a Ryzen appearance at Capsaicin 2017 seems very possible indeed.

Watch Radeon SVP and chief architect Raja Koduri talk with Gordon and Brad about Vega, FreeSync 2, the state of PC gaming, and more for over 40 minutes.

Nvidia strikes back

But Nvidia isn’t letting AMD hog the big stage. Team Green is hosting a “GeForce GTX Gaming Celebration” of its own from 6:30 p.m to 11:30 p.m. that night.

The event invite doesn’t specify whether there will be a live stream of Nvidia’s ode to PC gaming, but it does hint that there could be some product announcements. “Come join us for an evening of awesome PC gaming, hardware, tournaments and of course free food, drinks and a few other amazing surprises,” it says at one point, before ending with “You won’t want to miss this.”

The shindig may just be designed to help Nvidia cozy up to developers and gamers at GDC. But after the fabled GeForce GTX 1080 Ti failed to appear at CES 2017, the window is closing for Nvidia to release it without coming uncomfortably close to the eventual announcement of its next-gen Volta graphics cards. The GTX 10-series is already nine months old.

geforcegtx1080 0406

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Plus, Nvidia has a history of announcing new hardware at GDC. At GDC 2015, Nvidia revealed the original Shield TV console at a similar event. The very next day, CEO Jen-Hsun Huang casually strolled into a presentation by Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney, surprise-announced the original Titan X, and handed him a signed box before swaggering out like a boss.

Even if the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti doesn’t appear, Nvidia may have something else up its sleeve. GeForce Now for PCs and Mac, which lets you stream PC games from Nvidia’s servers to any computer, is scheduled to launch in early access this March. Nvidia’s GeForce GTX gaming celebration would be a fine time for a more concrete announcement.

Talk it out

We’ll know much more in just a couple of weeks. But one thing’s already certain: GDC 2017 is already shaping up to be one hell of an event.

This Friday, Gordon, Hayden, and I will be discussing our hopes and dreams for GDC on PCWorld’s bi-weekly Full Nerd podcast, at roughly 12:30 p.m. Eastern time. Be sure to follow PCWorld on Facebook or YouTube to tune in live and ask the crew your burning questions in real time.

source”cnbc”

A privacy-focused browser developer just bought Ghostery

cliqz acquires ghostery

Cliqz, the German developer of the privacy-focused browser of the same name, has acquired the tracker-blocking browser extension Ghostery and its development team from its creator, Evidon.

Partly owned by Mozilla, Cliqz will combine Ghostery’s technology with similar functions in its browser, but plans to continue development of the extension for other browsers too, it said Wednesday.

The sale will resolve an apparent conflict of interest for Evidon, which on the one hand provided the Ghostery extension to enhance privacy, and on the other sold aggregate information to businesses regarding which trackers users blocked. It will still obtain that aggregate information from Cliqz, but one step removed.

Sharing of aggregate data and the creation of user accounts are optional features of the extension.

The Ghostery antitracking tool has about 10 million active users worldwide, the companies said. One advantage of the acquisition that Cliqz touted is that it is based in Germany, a country with some of the strictest privacy laws in the world, which it said should provide better privacy protection for any data the company holds about its users.

While Cliqz sets about integrating Ghostery’s functions into its browser, it recommends adding the Ghostery extension to the Cliqz browser, or using the Ghostery and Cliqz extensions for Mozilla’s Firefox together. Cliqz offers beta versions of its browser for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android and iOS. The Ghostery extension is available for Chrome, Firefox, Edge, Internet Explorer, Safari and Opera, with some functions available in mobile apps for iOS and Android.

source”cnbc”